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Still A Dream…

Mother by Charles Wilbert White

[Editor's Note: This article is being revisited from last year's popular tribute, with a new twist. Please share!]

“Visual arts played an enormous role [in the civil rights movement]. [The arts] were not merely cultural adjuncts, but central to the struggle.”  Paul Von Blum UCLA Professor

On this Martin Luther King Jr. Day, The Bare Square recognizes a handful of the myriad of visual artists whose work inspired those struggling for civil rights or vice versa.

Born in Chicago in 1918, African-American painter and lithographer Charles Wilbert White studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Art Students League in New York City. He rose to prominence on the strength of his commissioned murals, and his artwork is now included in prestigious collections including the National Gallery of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Art. He taught for decades at Otis Art Institute.

Frederick Douglass Lives Again by Charles Wilbert White

Created in 1945, the artwork above right, entitled Mother, reflects White’s depiction of everyday people. Mother‘s strong, geometric, almost Cubist lines work with expressive eyes and overall darkness to convey sadness. The star on the window in the background reminds the viewer of the emotional trial of waiting for the return of a loved one who has gone off to war, in this case World War II.

White’s work often showed powerful figures from black history, as he did in Frederick Douglass Lives Again in 1949, shown right. White died in 1979.

Installation artist, performance artist, and sculptor David Hammons, born in 1943, grew up and studied art in Chicago and Los Angeles during the tumultuous 60s, before settling in New York City in 1974. He has numerous works included in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, as well as commissioned public artworks.

Spade With Chains by David Hammons

Hammons’ sculpture Spade with Chains (1973) and his painting Injustice Case (1970), showed his biting commentary on the African-American experience in America. Taking ownership of a derogatory moniker, Spade with Chains (right) reflects the heavy reality of hard labor and bondage of slavery.

Hammons sold snowballs in 1983 in downtown Manhattan as part of a performance art piece called the Blizz-aard Ball Sale. Hammons varied the prices of the snowballs according to size as a commentary on perceived value, the role of art galleries, the premium placed on “whiteness”, and the reality of selling wares in the street.

Hammons’ most recognizable work is probably African American Flag (1990), shown below left. Now part of the MoMA permanent collection, African American Flag uses the pattern of the American flag with black replaced for white and green replacing blue. The resulting red, black, and green flag reminds the viewer of colors often used in flags of African countries, and co-opts a familiar symbol of America to portray the black experience in America, making a powerful statement.

African American Flag by David Hammons

Today, African American artists abound. From the millions commanded by paintings of late graffiti artist Basquiat, to the breakout successes of Kehinde Wiley, and The Bare Square’s own Fred Scott. See his tribute below.

Artists like David Hammons, Charles Wilbert White, Faith Ringold, Elizabeth Catlet, Jacob Lawrence,  John Riddle, Betye Saar, and countless others paved their way.

Happy Birthday, Rev. Dr. King.

- James

MLK Blvd by Fred Scott, 2004, photograph

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posted by admin in Holiday and have Comments Off
Top 11 Bare Square ARTicles of 2011!

This year, The Bare Square brought you art news and comment on a globe-spanning range of topics. From Ai Wei Wei, to New York gallery openings, from the depths of the sea to deep space, you’ve come to The Bare Square and nibbled on our bite-sized art news. Thank you for making the Bare Square part of your art experience!

Because we’re rapidly approaching 200 articles, picking a Top Ten wasn’t easy–so we picked eleven. That didn’t make it much easier, but it did give you a bonus article!

Without further ado, here are the Top 11 ARTicles of 2011 from The Bare Square! See what you missed, revisit what you liked,  and PLEASE share with your friends and “Like”. Thanks again!

11. NASA Art

This July article discussed NASA art in a traveling exhibit in commemoration of 50 years of space exploration.

10. 3-D Art

This great entry penned by contributor Kulsoom Rizvi in September showed amazing sidewalk art.

9. Invisible Art

Jen Wallace, host of our web video show Art Seen, also contributes to The Bare Square. We published her story about actor James Franco’s art project in mid-July.

8. Art & Civil Rights

On Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, The Bare Square focused on Charles Wilbert White and David Hammons, African-American artists who paved the way for others.

Frederick Douglass Lives Again by Charles Wilbert White

7. Quietest Art Exhibition EVER

This summer, Jen covered the first known underwater art exhibit!

6. If Art Could Kill…

Before Halloween, Intern Tom McKee wrote a great top five list, but beware–NSFW and not for the queasy!

5. Mon Dieu! Laroux!

Kulsoom contributed to this profile of nAscent artist Jack Laroux. The article holds the honor of having the most “Likes” of any article this year–way to go Kulsoom! (And thanks to Jack for all his fans and supporters!)

Makers Mark and Cherries by Jack Laroux

 

4. Art Basel Miami

Jen wrote a fantastic series of articles about Art Basel Miami, including this wrap-up that got lots of shares, views, and “Likes.”

3. Japan & Katrina

The Bare Square felt a deep sense of shock, loss, and despair over the earthquake in Japan. The article at #3 discussed the role of art in the wake of tragedy.

2. To A Moustache

Being based in New York City, we at The Bare Square appreciated the work of street artist “Moustache,” having seen his handiwork ourselves many times. Sadly, the NYPD put an end to his vandalism, failing to see the humor in his clever “improvement” on public ads. People responded well to our remembrance…and we still miss him.

1. Proposal, Art Style

By far the most popular article in terms of ratio of “Likes” as compared to page views, and a just plain cool and romantic story, The Bare Square interviewed the creator of the best proposal story we’ve ever heard. Do yourself a favor–click the link, re-read the article, and watch the video (even if you’ve watched it before). With New Year’s Eve coming, let this story inspire even more romance!

"Marry Me" by Aaron Vandenbroucke

So that’s our Top 11 of 2011. We also have an honorable mention–Part II of the Egalitarian Art Revolution series. (Hmm–did the “Occupy” movement read it, too?)

Don’t forget to join our Facebook page!

- James Wallace

FacebookOrkutPrintFriendlyEmailShare
posted by admin in Holiday,news,Review,Street Art,technology,video and have Comments Off
Art and civil rights? Yup.

Mother by Charles Wilbert White

“Visual arts played an enormous role [in the civil rights movement]. [The arts] were not merely cultural adjuncts, but central to the struggle.”  Paul Von Blum UCLA Professor

On this Martin Luther King Jr. Day, The Bare Square recognizes a handful of the myriad of visual artists whose work inspired those struggling for civil rights or vice versa.

Born in Chicago in 1918, African-American painter and lithographer Charles Wilbert White studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Art Students League in New York City. He rose to prominence on the strength of his commissioned murals, and his artwork is now included in prestigious collections including the National Gallery of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Art. He taught for decades at Otis Art Institute.

Frederick Douglass Lives Again by Charles Wilbert White

Created in 1945, the artwork above right, entitled Mother, reflects White’s depiction of everyday people. Mother‘s strong, geometric, almost Cubist lines work with expressive eyes and overall darkness to convey sadness. The star on the window in the background reminds the viewer of the emotional trial of waiting for the return of a loved one who has gone off to war, in this case World War II.

White’s work often showed powerful figures from black history, as he did in Frederick Douglass Lives Again in 1949, shown right. White died in 1979.

Installation artist, performance artist, and sculptor David Hammons, born in 1943, grew up and studied art in Chicago and Los Angeles during the tumultuous 60s, before settling in New York City in 1974. He has numerous works included in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, as well as commissioned public artworks.

Spade With Chains by David Hammons

Hammons’ sculpture Spade with Chains (1973) and his painting Injustice Case (1970), showed his biting commentary on the African-American experience in America. Taking ownership of a derogatory moniker, Spade with Chains (right) reflects the heavy reality of hard labor and bondage of slavery.

Hammons sold snowballs in 1983 in downtown Manhattan as part of a performance art piece called the Blizz-aard Ball Sale. Hammons varied the prices of the snowballs according to size as a commentary on perceived value, the role of art galleries, the premium placed on “whiteness”, and the reality of selling wares in the street.

Hammons’ most recognizable work is probably African American Flag (1990), shown below left. Now part of the MoMA permanent collection, African American Flag uses the pattern of the American flag with black replaced for white and green replacing blue. The resulting red, black, and green flag reminds the viewer of colors often used in flags of African countries, and co-opts a familiar symbol of America to portray the black experience in America, making a powerful statement.

African American Flag by David Hammons

Today, African American artists abound. From the millions commanded by paintings of late graffiti artist Basquiat, to the breakout successes of Kehinde Wiley, and The Bare Square’s Fred Scott.

Artists like David Hammons, Charles Wilbert White, Faith Ringold, Elizabeth Catlet, Jacob Lawrence,  John Riddle, Betye Saar, and countless others paved their way.

Happy Birthday, Rev. Dr. King.

- James

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posted by JenWallace in Commentary,Fred Scott and have Comment (1)









 

 



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Still A Dream…


Mother by Charles Wilbert White

[Editor's Note: This article is being revisited from last year's popular tribute, with a new twist. Please share!]

“Visual arts played an enormous role [in the civil rights movement]. [The arts] were not merely cultural adjuncts, but central to the struggle.”  Paul Von Blum UCLA Professor

On this Martin Luther King Jr. Day, The Bare Square recognizes a handful of the myriad of visual artists whose work inspired those struggling for civil rights or vice versa.

Born in Chicago in 1918, African-American painter and lithographer Charles Wilbert White studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Art Students League in New York City. He rose to prominence on the strength of his commissioned murals, and his artwork is now included in prestigious collections including the National Gallery of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Art. He taught for decades at Otis Art Institute.

Frederick Douglass Lives Again by Charles Wilbert White

Created in 1945, the artwork above right, entitled Mother, reflects White’s depiction of everyday people. Mother‘s strong, geometric, almost Cubist lines work with expressive eyes and overall darkness to convey sadness. The star on the window in the background reminds the viewer of the emotional trial of waiting for the return of a loved one who has gone off to war, in this case World War II.

White’s work often showed powerful figures from black history, as he did in Frederick Douglass Lives Again in 1949, shown right. White died in 1979.

Installation artist, performance artist, and sculptor David Hammons, born in 1943, grew up and studied art in Chicago and Los Angeles during the tumultuous 60s, before settling in New York City in 1974. He has numerous works included in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, as well as commissioned public artworks.

Spade With Chains by David Hammons

Hammons’ sculpture Spade with Chains (1973) and his painting Injustice Case (1970), showed his biting commentary on the African-American experience in America. Taking ownership of a derogatory moniker, Spade with Chains (right) reflects the heavy reality of hard labor and bondage of slavery.

Hammons sold snowballs in 1983 in downtown Manhattan as part of a performance art piece called the Blizz-aard Ball Sale. Hammons varied the prices of the snowballs according to size as a commentary on perceived value, the role of art galleries, the premium placed on “whiteness”, and the reality of selling wares in the street.

Hammons’ most recognizable work is probably African American Flag (1990), shown below left. Now part of the MoMA permanent collection, African American Flag uses the pattern of the American flag with black replaced for white and green replacing blue. The resulting red, black, and green flag reminds the viewer of colors often used in flags of African countries, and co-opts a familiar symbol of America to portray the black experience in America, making a powerful statement.

African American Flag by David Hammons

Today, African American artists abound. From the millions commanded by paintings of late graffiti artist Basquiat, to the breakout successes of Kehinde Wiley, and The Bare Square’s own Fred Scott. See his tribute below.

Artists like David Hammons, Charles Wilbert White, Faith Ringold, Elizabeth Catlet, Jacob Lawrence,  John Riddle, Betye Saar, and countless others paved their way.

Happy Birthday, Rev. Dr. King.

- James

MLK Blvd by Fred Scott, 2004, photograph

FacebookOrkutPrintFriendlyEmailShare
posted by admin in Holiday and have Comments Off

Top 11 Bare Square ARTicles of 2011!

This year, The Bare Square brought you art news and comment on a globe-spanning range of topics. From Ai Wei Wei, to New York gallery openings, from the depths of the sea to deep space, you’ve come to The Bare Square and nibbled on our bite-sized art news. Thank you for making the Bare Square part of your art experience!

Because we’re rapidly approaching 200 articles, picking a Top Ten wasn’t easy–so we picked eleven. That didn’t make it much easier, but it did give you a bonus article!

Without further ado, here are the Top 11 ARTicles of 2011 from The Bare Square! See what you missed, revisit what you liked,  and PLEASE share with your friends and “Like”. Thanks again!

11. NASA Art

This July article discussed NASA art in a traveling exhibit in commemoration of 50 years of space exploration.

10. 3-D Art

This great entry penned by contributor Kulsoom Rizvi in September showed amazing sidewalk art.

9. Invisible Art

Jen Wallace, host of our web video show Art Seen, also contributes to The Bare Square. We published her story about actor James Franco’s art project in mid-July.

8. Art & Civil Rights

On Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, The Bare Square focused on Charles Wilbert White and David Hammons, African-American artists who paved the way for others.

Frederick Douglass Lives Again by Charles Wilbert White

7. Quietest Art Exhibition EVER

This summer, Jen covered the first known underwater art exhibit!

6. If Art Could Kill…

Before Halloween, Intern Tom McKee wrote a great top five list, but beware–NSFW and not for the queasy!

5. Mon Dieu! Laroux!

Kulsoom contributed to this profile of nAscent artist Jack Laroux. The article holds the honor of having the most “Likes” of any article this year–way to go Kulsoom! (And thanks to Jack for all his fans and supporters!)

Makers Mark and Cherries by Jack Laroux

 

4. Art Basel Miami

Jen wrote a fantastic series of articles about Art Basel Miami, including this wrap-up that got lots of shares, views, and “Likes.”

3. Japan & Katrina

The Bare Square felt a deep sense of shock, loss, and despair over the earthquake in Japan. The article at #3 discussed the role of art in the wake of tragedy.

2. To A Moustache

Being based in New York City, we at The Bare Square appreciated the work of street artist “Moustache,” having seen his handiwork ourselves many times. Sadly, the NYPD put an end to his vandalism, failing to see the humor in his clever “improvement” on public ads. People responded well to our remembrance…and we still miss him.

1. Proposal, Art Style

By far the most popular article in terms of ratio of “Likes” as compared to page views, and a just plain cool and romantic story, The Bare Square interviewed the creator of the best proposal story we’ve ever heard. Do yourself a favor–click the link, re-read the article, and watch the video (even if you’ve watched it before). With New Year’s Eve coming, let this story inspire even more romance!

"Marry Me" by Aaron Vandenbroucke

So that’s our Top 11 of 2011. We also have an honorable mention–Part II of the Egalitarian Art Revolution series. (Hmm–did the “Occupy” movement read it, too?)

Don’t forget to join our Facebook page!

- James Wallace

FacebookOrkutPrintFriendlyEmailShare
posted by admin in Holiday,news,Review,Street Art,technology,video and have Comments Off

Art and civil rights? Yup.


Mother by Charles Wilbert White

“Visual arts played an enormous role [in the civil rights movement]. [The arts] were not merely cultural adjuncts, but central to the struggle.”  Paul Von Blum UCLA Professor

On this Martin Luther King Jr. Day, The Bare Square recognizes a handful of the myriad of visual artists whose work inspired those struggling for civil rights or vice versa.

Born in Chicago in 1918, African-American painter and lithographer Charles Wilbert White studied at the Art Institute of Chicago and the Art Students League in New York City. He rose to prominence on the strength of his commissioned murals, and his artwork is now included in prestigious collections including the National Gallery of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of Art. He taught for decades at Otis Art Institute.

Frederick Douglass Lives Again by Charles Wilbert White

Created in 1945, the artwork above right, entitled Mother, reflects White’s depiction of everyday people. Mother‘s strong, geometric, almost Cubist lines work with expressive eyes and overall darkness to convey sadness. The star on the window in the background reminds the viewer of the emotional trial of waiting for the return of a loved one who has gone off to war, in this case World War II.

White’s work often showed powerful figures from black history, as he did in Frederick Douglass Lives Again in 1949, shown right. White died in 1979.

Installation artist, performance artist, and sculptor David Hammons, born in 1943, grew up and studied art in Chicago and Los Angeles during the tumultuous 60s, before settling in New York City in 1974. He has numerous works included in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, as well as commissioned public artworks.

Spade With Chains by David Hammons

Hammons’ sculpture Spade with Chains (1973) and his painting Injustice Case (1970), showed his biting commentary on the African-American experience in America. Taking ownership of a derogatory moniker, Spade with Chains (right) reflects the heavy reality of hard labor and bondage of slavery.

Hammons sold snowballs in 1983 in downtown Manhattan as part of a performance art piece called the Blizz-aard Ball Sale. Hammons varied the prices of the snowballs according to size as a commentary on perceived value, the role of art galleries, the premium placed on “whiteness”, and the reality of selling wares in the street.

Hammons’ most recognizable work is probably African American Flag (1990), shown below left. Now part of the MoMA permanent collection, African American Flag uses the pattern of the American flag with black replaced for white and green replacing blue. The resulting red, black, and green flag reminds the viewer of colors often used in flags of African countries, and co-opts a familiar symbol of America to portray the black experience in America, making a powerful statement.

African American Flag by David Hammons

Today, African American artists abound. From the millions commanded by paintings of late graffiti artist Basquiat, to the breakout successes of Kehinde Wiley, and The Bare Square’s Fred Scott.

Artists like David Hammons, Charles Wilbert White, Faith Ringold, Elizabeth Catlet, Jacob Lawrence,  John Riddle, Betye Saar, and countless others paved their way.

Happy Birthday, Rev. Dr. King.

- James

FacebookOrkutPrintFriendlyEmailShare
posted by JenWallace in Commentary,Fred Scott and have Comment (1)