Where Brooklyn Art!

Though 97% of 2012 remains ahead of us, that first 3% has FLOWN by. We’re almost halfway through January! How are those resolutions going?

Whatever vices you’ll miss, in exchange pick some art dates you won’t want to miss!

In Part Four of our five-part series, we leave Manhattan for one of the most underrated and often overlooked major venues–The Brooklyn Museum! Thus far, we’ve suggested key exhibits at The MoMA, The Met, and The Whitney.

Check out art from the Jazz Age, from a Bravo TV reality show winner, from a Red Hook-based artist, and from a pop art and street art icon. Brooklyn certainly knows how to mix it up. But don’t dally–two of these shows close in the next three weeks!

So, without further ado…Where Brooklyn at?

[Editor's Note:  Show descriptions are excerpts from The Brooklyn Museum's website.]

Youth & Beauty: Art of the American 20s

Started: Oct. 28, 2012

Ends: Jan. 29, 2012

Paul Cadmus by Luigi Lucioni, 1928. (Image from The Brooklyn Museum.)

How did American artists represent the Jazz Age? The exhibition Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties brings together for the first time the work of sixty-eight painters, sculptors, and photographers who explored a new mode of modern realism in the years bounded by the aftermath of the Great War and the onset of the Great Depression. American artists of the Jazz Age struggled to express the experience of a dramatically remade modern world, demonstrating their faith in the potentiality of youth and in the sustaining value of beauty.

Work of Art: Kymia Nawabi

Started: Dec. 22, 2011

Ends: Feb. 5, 2012

This exhibition highlights the work of Kymia Nawabi, the season-two winner of Bravo’s series Work of Art: The Next Great Artist, a recently concluded creative competition among contemporary artists from across the United States for a cash prize and an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. The judges for the Bravo show included series host China Chow; Bill Powers, a New York gallery owner and arts writer; and Jerry Saltz, art critic for New York magazine. Art auctioneer Simon de Pury served as a mentor to the contestants, and a new guest judge joined the panel each week.

Nawabi’s presentation, which she titled Not for Long, My Forlorn when it appeared on the final episode of Work of Art, may be seen as an expression of both her personal mythology and her ideas on the cyclical nature of life. Produced over a period of three months, it includes twelve paintings and two sculptures inspired by the Egyptian deity Thoth, most often represented as a man with the head of an ibis.

Raw/Cooked: Shura Chernozatonskaya

Starts: Jan. 27, 2012

Ends: Apr. 8, 2012

The third exhibition in the Raw/Cooked series features the work of Red Hook-based artist Shura Chernozatonskaya. For her Brooklyn Museum presentation, she has created two site-specific painting installations. The first consists of thirty-three canvases combined to create one large-scale work, displayed in the Museum’s Rubin Lobby. Each canvas features a composition of circles, evoking traffic lights, dominoes, and the rhythms of Latin music. The second installation, located in the Beaux-Arts Court, draws inspiration from the nearby European paintings collection.

Keith Haring

Starts: Mar. 16, 2012

Ends: Jul. 8, 2012

Untitled by Keith Haring, 1980. (Image from The Brooklyn Museum.)

Keith Haring: 1978–1982 is the first large-scale exhibition to explore the early career of one of the best-known American artists of the twentieth century. Tracing the development of Haring’s extraordinary visual vocabulary, the exhibition includes 155 works on paper, numerous experimental videos, and over 150 archival objects, including rarely seen sketchbooks, journals, exhibition flyers, posters, subway drawings, and documentary photographs. Pieces on view will include a number of very early works never before seen in public; seven video pieces, including Haring Paints Himself into a Corner (his first video piece) and Tribute to Gloria Vanderbilt; and collages created from cut-up fragments of his own writing, history textbooks, and newspapers.

Keep your calendar open for the last part of our five-part series, and please share with friends! What shows have you added to your calendar so far?

- James Wallace

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Where Brooklyn Art!

Though 97% of 2012 remains ahead of us, that first 3% has FLOWN by. We’re almost halfway through January! How are those resolutions going?

Whatever vices you’ll miss, in exchange pick some art dates you won’t want to miss!

In Part Four of our five-part series, we leave Manhattan for one of the most underrated and often overlooked major venues–The Brooklyn Museum! Thus far, we’ve suggested key exhibits at The MoMA, The Met, and The Whitney.

Check out art from the Jazz Age, from a Bravo TV reality show winner, from a Red Hook-based artist, and from a pop art and street art icon. Brooklyn certainly knows how to mix it up. But don’t dally–two of these shows close in the next three weeks!

So, without further ado…Where Brooklyn at?

[Editor's Note:  Show descriptions are excerpts from The Brooklyn Museum's website.]

Youth & Beauty: Art of the American 20s

Started: Oct. 28, 2012

Ends: Jan. 29, 2012

Paul Cadmus by Luigi Lucioni, 1928. (Image from The Brooklyn Museum.)

How did American artists represent the Jazz Age? The exhibition Youth and Beauty: Art of the American Twenties brings together for the first time the work of sixty-eight painters, sculptors, and photographers who explored a new mode of modern realism in the years bounded by the aftermath of the Great War and the onset of the Great Depression. American artists of the Jazz Age struggled to express the experience of a dramatically remade modern world, demonstrating their faith in the potentiality of youth and in the sustaining value of beauty.

Work of Art: Kymia Nawabi

Started: Dec. 22, 2011

Ends: Feb. 5, 2012

This exhibition highlights the work of Kymia Nawabi, the season-two winner of Bravo’s series Work of Art: The Next Great Artist, a recently concluded creative competition among contemporary artists from across the United States for a cash prize and an exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum. The judges for the Bravo show included series host China Chow; Bill Powers, a New York gallery owner and arts writer; and Jerry Saltz, art critic for New York magazine. Art auctioneer Simon de Pury served as a mentor to the contestants, and a new guest judge joined the panel each week.

Nawabi’s presentation, which she titled Not for Long, My Forlorn when it appeared on the final episode of Work of Art, may be seen as an expression of both her personal mythology and her ideas on the cyclical nature of life. Produced over a period of three months, it includes twelve paintings and two sculptures inspired by the Egyptian deity Thoth, most often represented as a man with the head of an ibis.

Raw/Cooked: Shura Chernozatonskaya

Starts: Jan. 27, 2012

Ends: Apr. 8, 2012

The third exhibition in the Raw/Cooked series features the work of Red Hook-based artist Shura Chernozatonskaya. For her Brooklyn Museum presentation, she has created two site-specific painting installations. The first consists of thirty-three canvases combined to create one large-scale work, displayed in the Museum’s Rubin Lobby. Each canvas features a composition of circles, evoking traffic lights, dominoes, and the rhythms of Latin music. The second installation, located in the Beaux-Arts Court, draws inspiration from the nearby European paintings collection.

Keith Haring

Starts: Mar. 16, 2012

Ends: Jul. 8, 2012

Untitled by Keith Haring, 1980. (Image from The Brooklyn Museum.)

Keith Haring: 1978–1982 is the first large-scale exhibition to explore the early career of one of the best-known American artists of the twentieth century. Tracing the development of Haring’s extraordinary visual vocabulary, the exhibition includes 155 works on paper, numerous experimental videos, and over 150 archival objects, including rarely seen sketchbooks, journals, exhibition flyers, posters, subway drawings, and documentary photographs. Pieces on view will include a number of very early works never before seen in public; seven video pieces, including Haring Paints Himself into a Corner (his first video piece) and Tribute to Gloria Vanderbilt; and collages created from cut-up fragments of his own writing, history textbooks, and newspapers.

Keep your calendar open for the last part of our five-part series, and please share with friends! What shows have you added to your calendar so far?

- James Wallace

FacebookOrkutPrintFriendlyEmailShare
posted by admin in museums,Street Art and have Comments Off